Robert Jospé/Inner Rhythm,
Blue Blaze

1. "Calling Miss Khadija"

"Calling Miss Khadija" was composed by hard bop trumpeter Lee Morgan when he was playing with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers in the 1960s. It is a 12-bar blues in a meter of 6 beats to the bar (compare it with Wes Montgomery, "West Coast Blues," Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz V:2) and features solos by John D'earth and guest artist, Michael Brecker, on tenor sax.

Introduction:

0:00

Jospé (playing drum set with his hands), D'earth (playing clay flutes), and Brecker, tenor saxophone

0:51

vamp (guitar)

0:58

add bass, piano

1:19

riff

head (12-bar blues)

1:26

1:47

trumpet solo, John D'earth (3 choruses)

2:08

2:29

2:50

tenor sax solo, Michael Brecker (3 choruses)

3:11

3:32

3:53

(with background riffs)

drum solo, Robert Jospé

4:14

with bass line and D'earth on flutes

head

5:09

5:31

coda

5:52-end


2. "Blue Blaze"

"Blue Blaze," by Jospé and Hallahan, modifies the usual 32-bar AABA form by following it with a additional contrasting 14-bar section ("C").

Introduction

0:00

guitar and tenor sax, free rhythm

0:41

ostinato, bass and guitar

head

A

0:52

A

1:03

B

1:14

A

1:24

C

1:34

guitar solo, Royce Campbell

A

1:55

A

2:06

B

2:17

A

2:27

C

2:38

piano solo, Bob Hallahan

A

2:58

A

3:08

B

3:19

A

3:30

C

3:40

Jospé, drums (over bass ostinato)

3:59

                 

head

A

4:41

A

4:52

B

5:03

A

5:14

C

5:25


3. "Cape Verdean Blues"

Despite its title, "Cape Verdean Blues," by hard bop composer Horace Silver, is not a 12-bar blues. Rather, it is a tune that modifies the usual 32-bar AABA form by repeating the B section (AABBA). Note that the drum and percussion solos are not open-ended, but follow the AABBA form.

introduction

0:00

Jospé and Davis, drums and percussion

head

A

0:15

A

0:30

B

0:45

B

1:00

A

1:15

piano solo, Bob Hallahan

A

1:33

A

1:47

B

2:02

B

2:17

A

2:31

tenor sax solo, Michael Brecker

A

2:46

A

3:01

B

3:16

B

3:30

A

3:45

Jospé, drums

A

4:00

A

4:15

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin Davis, percussion

 

 

 

 

B

4:29

B

4:44

 

 

Robert Jospé, drums

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

4:59

head

A

5:14

A

5:29

B

5:44

B

5:58

A

6:13

coda

 

6:28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


4. "Night Out"

"Night Out" is a 32-bar AABA tune by Robert Jospé: note how the straightforward bluesy quality of the A section contrasts with the more dissonant character of the bridge, or B section. (Compare this performance with the version on the Freebridge Quintet CD, Spanning Time.)

introduction

0:00

 

head

A

0:12

A

0:23

B

0:35

A

0:46

guitar solo, Royce Campbell

A

0:58

A

1:09

B

1:20

A

1:31

piano solo, Bob Hallahan

A

1:42

A

1:54

B

2:05

A

2:16

"trading eights" (alternating eight-bar solos: D'earth, trumpet, and Decker, tenor sax)

A

2:27

A

2:38

 

 

 

 

"trading fours" (alternating four-bar solos, D'earth, trumpet, and Decker, tenor sax)

 

 

 

 

B

2:49

A

3:00

A

3:11

A

3:23

 

 

 

 

"trading twos" (alternating two-bar solos, D'earth, trumpet, and Decker, tenor sax)

 

 

 

 

B

3:34

 

 

simultaneous improvisation

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

3:45

trading fours with Robert Jospé, drums

A

3:57 (guitar)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

4:07 (piano)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B

4:18 (trumpet)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

4:29 (tenor sax)

vamp

4:40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

head

A

4:52

A

5:03

B

5:15

A

5:26


5. "Infant Eyes"

Like many compositions by Wayne Shorter, the lovely ballad "Infant Eyes"(which first appeared on Shorter's 1964 album Speak No Evil) has its own unique construction. It consists of two sections (labeled here A & B), each of which lasts eighteen bars.

introduction

0:00

(free rhythm)

head

A (rubato)

0:17

B (in tempo)

1:03

A (rubato)

1:46

piano solo, Bob Hallahan

A

2:44

B

3:27

tenor sax solo, Jeff Decker

A

4:08

B

4:48

head

A (rubato)

5:30

 

 


6."Fungii Mama"

"Fungii Mama," a composition in a Latin groove by hard bop trumpet player Blue Mitchell, is a 32-bar AABA tune based on the familiar chord progression to Gershwin's "I Got Rhythm."

introduction

0:00

Kevin Davis, marimba--free rhythm

0:16

riff

head

A

0:27

A

0:35

B

0:43

A

0:52

trumpet solo, John D'earth (2 choruses)

(preceded by "send-off riff")

A

1:00

A

1:08

 

 

 

 

(without send-off riff)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B

1:17

A

1:25

A

1:34

A

1:42

B

1:50

A

1:58

piano solo, Bob Hallahan (2 choruses)

A

2:07

A

2:15

B

2:23

A

2:31

A

2:39

A

2:47

B

2:55

A

3:04

Robert Jospé, drums

A

3:12

A

3:20

B

3:28

A

3:36

interlude

 

3:43

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

3:11

A

3:23

 

 

 

 

head

A

3:47

A

3:55

B

4:03

A

4:11

coda

 

4:19

 

 

 

 

 

 


7. "Down to the Wire"

Not every tune follows a simple, schematic pattern. "Down to the Wire" by Robert Jospé features a complicated arrangement that rotates among several different kinds of structures. Note in particular how the arrangement uses modulation--changing key from one tonal center to another.

introduction

0:00

Pete Spaar, bass (melody of the head, monophonic texture)

0:09

three-note ostinato (key of F)

head

A

0:18

A

0:27

B

0:37

B

0:47

A

0:57

1:07

three-note ostinato moves up to the key of A-flat

interlude I (8-bar sections)

1:15

in the key of A-flat

1:25

in the key of B-flat

1:35

back to the key of A-flat

piano solo, Bob Hallahan

form: 32-bar AABA,
A sections in the key of A-flat, B section in the key of B-flat

A

1:45

A

1:54

B

2:04

A

2:13

A

2:23

A

2:32

B

2:41

A

2:51

interlude II (8-bar sections)

3:00

in the key of A-flat

3:10

 

tenor sax solo, Jeff Decker

form: 32-bar AAAA, all sections in the key of F

A

3:19

A

3:29

A

3:38

A

3:47

form: 32-bar AABA,
A sections in the key of A-flat, B section in the key of B-flat

A

3:57

A

4:06

B

4:15

A

4:24

4:33

three-note ostinato, key of F

head

A

4:48

A

4:57

B

5:07

B

5:16

A

5:26

interlude I
(serving as background for guitar solo)

5:36

in the key of A-flat

5:45

in the key of B-flat

5:55

in the key of A-flat

6:04

in the key of B-flat

6:14

in the key of A-flat

6:23

in the key of B-flat

6:33

in the key of A-flat

6:42

in the key of B-flat

6:52

in the key of A-flat


8. "Nick of Time"

In most tunes, the structure that you hear in the head is the same one that will be used as the basis for improvisation. "Nick of Time" is an exception. The "head," such as it is, consists mainly of an unpredictable series of melodic and rhythmic ideas unfolding over a highly syncopated bass line typical of Latin music. This goes on for some time without suggesting any particular pattern (and with a few surprises of its own: notice the sudden move up a half-step at 0:56). Finally, there is a contrasting section which, like a bridge, moves to a different harmony.

The solo improvisations in "Nick of Time" have a much more regular structure. I have diagrammed the form as 32-bar AABC--in other words, a variant of AABA in which the last section continues to contrast with the more regular form in the opening A sections.

 

introduction

0:00

piano chords

0:08

horns

0:16

Latin bass ostinato

"head"

0:24

horn lines

1:15

"bridge"

trumpet solo, John D'earth (2 choruses, AABC)

A

1:25

A

1:32

B

1:40

C

1:47

A

1:55

A

2:02

B

2:10

C

2:17

piano solo, Bob Hallahan (2 choruses)

A

2:25

A

2:32

B

2:40

C

2:47

A

2:55

A

3:02

B

3:10

C

3:17

3:25

Robert Jospé, drums, and Kevin Davis, percussion (over bass ostinato)

"head"

4:01

 

4:52

"bridge"


9."Aqua de Beber"

"Aqua de Beber" was written by the great Brazilian composer, Antonio Carlos Jobim. This performance treats the tune less as a vehicle for improvisation than as an opportunity to enjoy the subtle beauty of the composed melody and harmony.

The form of the tune rotates among several 8-bar sections. The A section, heard for the first time at 0:31 and many times thereafter, contains the main melody and is for the most part played with little variation. It is followed by a section that I have diagrammed as B + B'--in other words, two closely related 8-bar phrases, and a further section ("C") that begins with a lovely and unexpected major chord.

introduction

0:00

percussion

 

0:16

bass line

 

soprano sax, Jeff Decker

A

0:31

A

0:46

B

1:01

B'

1:15

C

1:31

A

1:45

B

2:00

B'

2:15

C

2:30

A

2:44

 

 

 

 

guitar, Royce Campbell

 

 

 

 

B

3:00

B'

3:14

C

3:28

 

 

 

 

 

 

soprano sax, Decker

 

 

A

3:42

 

 

 

 

bass solo, Pete Spaar

A

3:58

A

4:12

 

 

 

 

soprano sax, Decker

 

 

 

 

B

4:27

B'

4:41

C

4:56

A

5:11

A

5:25

 

 


10. "Minor's Holiday"

The 32-bar AABA composition "Minor's Holiday" by trumpet player Kenny Dorham comes from the repertory of Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers from the mid-1950s.

head

A

0:00

A

0:08

B

0:15

A

0:23

interlude

 

0:31

 

 

 

 

 

 

trumpet solo, John D'earth (2 choruses)

A

0:38

A

0:46

B

0:53

A

1:00

A

1:08

A

1:15

B

1:22

 

 

 

 

 

composed riff

 

 

A

1:29

tenor sax solo, Jeff Decker (2 choruses)

A

1:37

A

1:44

B

1:52

A

1:59

A

2:06

A

2:13

B

2:21

 

 

 

 

 

composed riff

 

 

A

2:28

guitar solo, Royce Campbell (2 choruses)

A

2:35

A

2:43

B

2:50

A

2:57

A

3:04

A

3:12

B

3:19

A

3:26

 

"trading eights" (alternating eight-bar solos: D'earth, trumpet, Decker, tenor sax, and Jospé, drums)

D'earth

A

3:33

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jospé

 

 

A

3:41

 

 

 

 

Decker

 

 

 

 

B

3:48

 

 

Jospé

 

 

 

 

 

A

3:55

Campbell

A

4:02

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jospé

 

 

A

4:09

 

 

 

 

D'earth

 

 

 

 

B

4:16

 

 

Jospé

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

4:24

head

A

4:31

A

4:38

B

4:46

A

4:53

coda

 

5:01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


11. "World Beat Suite"

"World Beat Suite" has no particular form in the sense we have studied in class. It is an open-ended improvisation by percussionists Jospé and Davis, augmented by D'earth on clay flutes and ocarina, over several different grooves.

introduction (free rhythm)

0:00

groove #1

0:34

groove #2

3:11

groove #3

5:13