SOURCE: THE DUST BOWL SITE
(WHERE YOU CAN SEE MOVIE OF DUST STORM)

Steinbeck Homepage


PICTURES & A THOUSAND WORDS OR SO
WESTWARD THE COURSE . . .

Whitman, "Song of Myself," [Section 38, 1855 Text]      
    I troop forth replenished with supreme power, one of an average unending procession,
    We walk the roads of Ohio and Massachusetts and Virginia and Wisconsin and New York and
        New Orleans and Texas and Montreal and San Francisco and Charleston and Savannah and Mexico,
    Inland and by the seacoast and boundary lines . . . . and we pass the boundary lines.
    Our swift ordinances are on their way over the whole earth,
    The blossoms we wear in our hats are the growth of two thousand years.

Whitman, "Song of Myself," Section 38, [1891-1892 Text]      
    I troop forth replenish'd with supreme power, one of an average unending procession,
    Inland and sea-coast we go, and pass all boundary lines,
    Our swift ordinances on their way over the whole earth,
    The blossoms we wear in our hats the growth of thousands of years.


Eliot, The Waste Land, Section 5      
    Who are those hooded hordes swarming
    Over endless plains, stumbling in cracked earth
    Ringed by the flat horizon only
    What is the city over the mountains
    Cracks and reforms and bursts in the violet air
    Falling towers
    Jerusalem Athens Alexandria
    Vienna London
    Unreal



NATURALISM WITHOUT SOCIALISM . . .

Crane, The Red Badge of Courage, opening paragraph      
        The cold passed reluctantly from the earth, and the retiring fogs revealed an army stretched
    out on the hills, resting. As the landscape changed from brown to green, the army awakened,
    and began to tremble with eagerness at the noise of rumors. It cast its eyes upon the roads,
    which were growing from long troughs of liquid mud to proper thoroughfares. A river, amber-
    tinted in the shadow of its banks, purled at the army's feet; and at night, when the stream had
    become of a sorrowful blackness, one could see across it the red, eyelike gleam of hostile
    camp-fires set in the low brows of distant hills.


CLICK ON ANY IMAGE TO ENLARGE IT:

  In its 19 February 1940 issue Life Magazine did a two-page spread on Steinbeck's book, the recently released movie version of it, and American reality. The article notes that both Steinbeck and the movie have been accused of exaggerating the conditions for the migrants in California. Click on any part of the article to enlarge it.
TROUBLED MOTHER QUESTIONING SON BATTERED JALOPY TATTERED TENT TYPICAL OKIE CAMP FARMERS WITHOUT LAND


"The fascist crowd will try to sabotage this book because it is revolutionary. They try to give it the communist angle. However, The Battle Hymn is American and intensely so. . . . So if both words and music are there the book is keyed into the American scene from the beginning." — Steinbeck, letter to his editor at Viking.


RELATED WEB SITES

NATIONAL STEINBECK CENTER

THE CENTER FOR STEINBECK STUDIES


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