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       Art of Rock Concert Lighting

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Showcase » Psychedelic Lighting Workshop 2004 » Responses

Psychedelic project responses

Darren: I noticed that communication was the biggest barrier that my group and I needed to conquer in order to have a functioning LIGHT SHOW.

Matt: [The Light Show] is very interesting to watch, but gets old fast, even with a variety of changes and differences. However, to whomever was working behind the scenes… it most likely would have been an exhilarating experience, full of rushing and timing and a small portion of chaos…

Chris: Essentially, the entire light show performance was a study in communication, teamwork dynamics, and improvisational creativity.

Ben: While the Joshua Light Show inevitable brought a heavily drugged crowd, I believe the light show would have been a success regardless of drug use. However, I do believe the two are linked, and the hippie counter-culture that brought about the wave of drug use was the same phenomenon that introduced the light show.

Jessica: (on organizing the light show) …during the set-up time we went through an outline of the song and divided up jobs, as well as discussed transition points between group members. … By following this outline during our improvisational piece, we were organized and had control of what was going on.

David: The Psychedelic Light Show was definitely a pleasant change of pace in the young lives of our collegiate academic schedules. Overall I found this to be a fun experience as both performer and viewer. It was interesting to produce and orchestrate a light show, but I surely enjoyed myself more watching what my classmates created. This project gave me a greater appreciation for light shows and the light crews behind the scenes.

Greg: The light shows lasted such a short period of time for a number of reasons. The most obvious to me is the fact that only so much can be done with light, and you reach certain limits unless you have an advance in technology. The light shows probably had very limited technology, and without the invention of computers in that time period, the audiences may have run out of interest in what was being put on the screen.

Justine: In creating our performance, we just let things happen. During our practice session we just played some of the potential music choices until we found one that everyone was really jamming to and then we proceeded to play Tales of rave Ulysses over and over while experimenting with the various supplies and lights available to us. These very improved practices evolved the various roles we would take for the actual performances until we each found our niche artistically or otherwise.