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Ironically, the farther Quakers, Dunkards, Lutherans, and Presbyterians traveled from the Delaware, the closer they came to William Penn's vision of humanity not divided by creeds but united by a simple belief in God the Father. William Penn, however, would probably have been disappointed to see frontier Quakers moving closer to the bellicose attitudes of their Presbyterian neighbors when it came to dealing with "enemies."

At about the time longhunter William Carr was born in Albemarle County, Charles Lynch was born just a few miles away in a log house near present Pen Park on the Rivanna River. Charles Sr. was an Irish Quaker who worshipped at the Sugarloaf Mountain meeting east of Charlottesville. About 1750 he moved to present Campbell County where his son, Captain Charles, gave the family name to Lynchburg and to the term Lynch Law. Despite what his name has since come to represent, Captain Lynch didn't usually hang the suspected horse thieves and Tories he illegally tried; he preferred rather to stripe their backs thirty-nine times with a hickory and banish them from the neighborhood.

On a 1749 tour through western Virginia, Moravian missionaries Leonard Schnell and Joseph Brandmueller from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania preached to German families on the south fork of the Potomac who earnestly sought baptism for their children. Although most of these settlers were unchurched, baptism still meant something to them. But while the women faithfully attended sermons, the men often went bear hunting. The Brothers were reluctant to administer baptism to children whose parents weren't ready to provide religious training. The settlers, however, were dismayed that missionaries could teach "that the saviour accepts all men and yet refuse to baptize these children."

Farther south, in present Highland and Bath counties, the missionaries were never turned away from the doors of wolf-haunted Irish cabins on Cowpasture River. Here the Brothers shared the last of their bread with the family of Hercules Wilson, and accepted bear meat in return; they discussed religion with Mr. and Mrs. James Scott over a breakfast of hominy and buttermilk; and just west of Eagle Rock, on Craig's Creek, they spent the night on bear skins with the family of John Crawford. Despite "rather poor" conditions where "the clothes of the people consist of deer skins," and "their food, of johnny cakes, deer and bear meat," Mr. Brandmueller found a tanner to sole his shoes before the Brothers faced about to return home through the Irish Tract. "The shoemaker, whose wife was a zealous Presbyterian, told us ... he had read a printed sermon about us, and he had hardly ever read a clearer sermon."


Introduction Finns English Germans Scots-Irish African-Americans
Native-Americans Warfare Warrior Society Religion Housing Clothing

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