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Model Project Test Results
Local Instability

Arch 324, Introduction to Structural Design, University of Virginia
Last updated Monday, March 11 1996, at 9:59 PM Copyright © 1996, Kirk Martini

Local Instability

Other structures experienced failure due to local instability as compression regions buckled laterally. In some cases the structure continued to carry additional beyond the initiation of local buckling, in other cases, local buckling led to load eccentricites that then led to global instability.

This arch structure buckled under a relatively small load. The resulting eccentricity of the load and the reactions would have toppled the structure, but the loading bucket hit the floor and relieved the load.
The well-behaved beam structure shows signs of local buckling along its compression edge, but continues to carry load.
This beam shows extreme local buckling along its compression edge. The vertical laminations are not restricted from slippling, making the beam easier to buckle.
This beam shows local buckling at midspan, the location of the maximum moment. This mode of buckling is similar to modes found in steel beams manufactured from thin plates.
A detail of the local buckling shown above.

As the examples above suggest, local buckling can initiate more global buckling, as shown in the arch structure below.

The vertical struts of this arch structure show clear local buckling under compression, although the structure continues to carry load.
The same arch structure later failed under a global buckling mode.

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Last updated Monday, March 11 1996, at 9:59 PM
Copyright © 1996, Kirk Martini
Please send comments or questions to Martini@virginia.edu
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