VITA

JAMES N. DEMAS

Professor

Department of Chemistry`

University of Virginia

Personal: Born: December 28, 1942, Washington, DC

Married (two children)

Education: B. S. (Chemistry) The University of New Mexico (1964)

Ph.D. (Chemistry) with G. A. Crosby, The University of New Mexico (1970). Research and some courses were carried out at Washington State University (1967-1969)

NSF Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Southern California (1970-1971)

Professional Experience:

Professor, University of Virginia (1985- )

Visiting Staff Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory (1983-84 and 1995-96)

Associate Professor, University of Virginia (1977-85)

Assistant Professor, University of Virginia (1971-77)

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Southern California (1970-71)

Professional Memberships and Offices:

ASTM 1.02.6-A national study group on laser intensity measurements (1973-1977)

Sigma Xi (Vice President, UVA Chapter 1980-1981)

Sigma Xi (President, UVA Chapter 1981-1982)

AXE Chemical Fraternity (Member UVA Housing Committee, 1982- 88)

The American Chemical Society

The Inter-American Photochemical Society

Optical Society of America

Virginia Section ACS Executive Committee (1985- )

Cochair Macromolecule Metal Complexes III, (1986-1990) a trilateral Chinese, Japanese, US Conference held at Rider College (1990).

Executive Committee Macromolecule Metal Complexes IV (1990-1992)

Associate Editor Journal of Fluorescence (1992-)

Sigma Xi (Secretary Treasurer, UVA Chapter 1993-1994)

Sigma Xi (Executive Committee, UVA Chapter 1995-)

Honors and Awards:

1964-1966 NASA Graduate Traineeship

1966-1968 NSF Graduate Fellowship

1966 Petroleum Research Fund Fellowship

1970 NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship

1976, 1987, 1990, and 1991 University of Virginia Sigma Xi President & Visitors Research Prize

1983, 1995 Sesquicentennial Fellowship at Los Alamos National Lab.

1999 ACS Virginia Section Distinguished Service Award

Hobbies: Computers, electronics, avid if not overly skilled skier, hiking, white water rafting, and karate (third degree black belt in Tae Kwondo). He is currently learning the Japanese sword and studying for his 4th degree black belt in Naharita karate. He is an avid movie buff and writes reviews for his students and advisees.

Miscellaneous:

He is actively involved in both research (over 150 research publications, one monographs, and five US patents on luminescence with others pending) and in education. He has numerous publications in J. Chem. Ed. and an integrated lecture/laboratory text on computer interfacing and scientific computing. About a third of his research publications are with undergraduate co-authors and about half of these have the undergraduate as first author. He has presented several plenary lectures at international conferences (Austria, Italy, Japan) on luminescence, sensors, and polymer interactions of metal complexes. He has taught a four-week chemistry enrichment (grades 3-9) program to minority students in the Saturday Academy through our Afro-American Studies program. He organized and, for nine summers, has run a highly successful REU program for undergraduates in the Department. He is chairman of the Department Undergraduate advising program and has oversight of all the undergraduate research including a series of research seminars that he implemented.