Personnel

Gerald L. Clore

Gerald L. Clore (Texas Phd; Stanford Postdoc) is Commonwealth Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia and formerly Alumni Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois.

His research focuses on emotion and its cognitive consequences, and has resulted in a citation H-Index of 54. He co-authored The Cognitive Structure of Emotions, a general theory of how psychological situations elicit emotions and make them intense. Its chief application is in computer science as the emotion engine of intelligent agents in computer games, and interactive training modules. His research (funded by NIMH and NSF) concerns the affect-as-information hypothesis, which clarifies how affective information about value and urgency regulates cognition, motivation, and memory. He has served as Associate Editor of Cognition and Emotion, as faculty in the NIMH Consortium on Emotion, and as Visiting Professor at Harvard. He has also been a visiting scholar at Harvard, Oxford, and New York University and a Fellow of the Centers for Advanced Study at Illinois and Stanford, and a fellow of the Rockefeller Center in Bellagio, Italy. In 2010 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2013 he received the William James Award for lifetime scientific achievement from the Association for Psychological Science.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Curriculum Vitae

 

Calvin Lai

My research interests include implicit social cognition, attitudes, prejudice, and stereotyping. Specifically, I am investigating effective methods for changing implicit social biases. Many approaches to change implicit biases have been identified but, little is known about which approaches produce the most impactful and long-lasting changes. My research program seeks to address this gap. The breadth of this work has included: examining the role of moral emotions in reducing prejudice toward gay individuals, experimentally comparing eighteen interventions to reduce implicit racial biases, and a forthcoming meta-analysis on experimental methods to change implicit attitudes, stereotypes, self-esteem, and identity.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Website

 

David Reinhard

My research interests involve studying how different thought processing styles relate to each other and how these styles can influence emotion regulation. Specifically, I am interested in examining the similarities and differences between global vs. local (i.e. focusing on "the forest" vs. "the trees"), abstract vs. concrete, and holistic vs. analytic processing styles. In addition, I'm interested in examining how employing these thought processing styles can influence our responses to emotional events. For example, how does thinking about an event globally differ from thinking about an event abstractly? And, how do these different processing styles influence how we respond to emotional events?

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

   

Elizabeth Gilbert

I study how people reason and make decisions. More specifically my current research addresses how emotions, counterfactual thinking (i.e., imagining “if only” something had been different), and cultural differences affect assignment of causation and blame. (Much of this research is directly inspired by my time working in the legal world.) With Professor Clore I am examining whether making people aware of their emotions may decrease the impact of moral judgments on causation and blame. With Professor Clore and Yishan Xu I am also comparing many measures that have been used to assess global, local, holistic, and analytic thinking styles.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Website