\ Ben Webster: Application Materials

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My proposal for an NSF Algebra Grant from 2011 (my CAREER was funded):

My project summary.

My project description.

The CV submitted with the grant.

Some of you might wonder "but wait, what about your CAREER proposal?" I think with the perspective of time that my proposal is not a good example and that the world would not benefit from more people reading it. If you want my thoughts on CAREER preparation (which are many), for the moment you should email me privately.


My proposal for an NSA Young Investigator Grant from 2008 (which was funded):
Caveat lector: At the time NSA had much less strict criteria for proposal structure than the NSF (no page limit, less specific review criteria, a normal CV instead of the NSF bio), so do not model an NSF proposal directly on these documents. It seems that they now have different rules, still not the same as the NSF. You have been warned.

My project summary.

My project description.

The CV submitted with the grant.


Some application materials from my job search of 2008-2009 (which ended in a tenure-track position at the University of Oregon):

My cover letter for U of O: Obviously, I had a slightly different cover letter for each school, but this is representative enough.

My research statement: Unlike my postdoc statement, this is a program I'm still working on.

My teaching statement.

My CV at the time.


Some application materials from my job search of 2006-2007 (which ended successfully in an NSF Fellowship, Instructorship at MIT and one-year appointment at IAS):

Three cover letters, for MIT and Stanford: They're mostly the same boilerplate; the only important differences are in the second paragraph. Hopefully I was right in thinking that cover letters aren't actually of great importance.

My research statement: In case any of you are wondering, no, I didn't do any of this research. Maybe next year. If any of you get brilliant ideas based on this stuff, give me an email, and we can write the paper ;)

My teaching statement

My CV at the time: I used Ezra Miller's wonderful template, which I think is the most aesthetically pleasing I know of.